Labelled Racism

 

Racism being hidden under a cloak of nationalism as portrayed by Boris Johnston and Nigel Farage is as English as it comes, just as racism being normalised by such as Donald Trump and his cohort in the USA is as American as it comes.

The difference is that in the USA Donald Trump and his devoted followers don’t seem to care or even hide their racism whereas in the UK the fear of being tagged with the label racist remains a major one to the majority of the Johnston/Farage supporters because they know it can really hurt them.

And before anyone gets uppity and has a hissy-fit that I have put Boris Johnston and Nigel Farage in the same bracket I will say only this, “look at their record”.

If you then still think they are not racist then as far as I’m concerned it is increasingly likely that you share the same ideas and lack of moral fibre and moral compass as them.

The ‘closet’ racists of course know that racists especially here in the UK are generally considered to have no credibility or redeeming qualities, which to put it bluntly makes then despicable human beings.

So the question is why would anyone want to employ them or have any dealings with them whatsoever unless of course you agree with their view of the world?

Why would you choose to work for them or support them in anyway?

The truth is of course that racism does exist and is very real, and yes there is racism between different races not only white v black (and any other non-white skin colour) but let’s face facts white people and especially white men are instrumental in embedding racism in western nations to the extent that in many walks of life it has become institutionalised.

The reality for many young white men at the start of their careers in certain sectors of employment is that they have benefitted from the institutionalisation of racism and see no reason not to continue to promote and benefit from it.

Why change it if it isn’t broken?

“It was good enough for my father, it’s good enough for me and will be good enough for my sons”.

And yet the same people will not openly admit to being racist and god (if you believe in a god that is) help anyone who even hints at suggesting that they are being racist.

When did being labelled a racist become more important and insulting than the racism itself?

More importantly perhaps is when did the fear of being outed as a racist become more of a fear than being a racist.

As a ‘white man’ I of course even though I was brought up in a very working class environment am very conscious of the fact that I had an immediate advantage by simply having been born white in the UK for no other reason than the colour of my skin.

This was reinforced throughout my school days in the 50’s and early 60’s by constantly being reminded that I was privileged to have been born into a nation that controlled the greatest empire (on which the sun never set) the world had ever known.

We even had maps on the classroom wall in which the empire was shown in pink and yes to young minds and eyes it was very impressive especially when you were being told how it was achieved by people from these islands travelling at great risk to themselves to educate and civilise the natives.

What I’m also conscious of as a white man of a certain age and experience is just how dangerous it is for a white person to call out and challenge other white people over racism.

Bloody hell fire it is a certain way to be kicked out of the white mans club, even murdering the secretary would be excused but labelling another man racist even if all of the evidence clearly demonstrates they are would be unforgivable.

Not only is it unforgivable if the “club” had their way you would be sectioned, declare insane and confined to an institution until you mended your ways.

The white mans anti- labelling racist club would certainly have given the Spanish Inquisition a run for their money.

Except of course the Spanish Inquisition were foreign so would have had no chance.

I suppose the question is why has it now become so ingrained in western societies and especially the English speaking ones that so many have racist views (the Brexit “we want our country back – to many immigrants, the Trump racist policies) and yet don’t think of themselves as racist.

Or perhaps more accurately don’t want their racism to be labelled.

Well you can either be or not be racist and if you are then tough you can’t be racist and not have the label attached.

Some time ago Boris Johnston referred to and labelled people from African Nations as “pickaninny’s” (strangely the origin is a derogatory term for dark-skinned children of African descent and applied to juveniles in the USA), Nigel Farage promoted hatred of foreigners by stoking up fears of the UK being engulfed in a tide of people from the Middle East and Turkey, and who can forget Donald Trump referring to countries when introducing his immigration policies as “shithole countries” most of which are countries of black or brown people.

What all three of them promote is white immigration only policies (which of course they will all deny) based on nothing more that the colour of a persons skin and their own innate racism.

What is troubling is that so many people support them which brings me back to the main point.

If those who demonstrate racist attitudes are more frightened of being labelled racist than actually being racist then the sooner they are labelled the sooner their fears will be realised and perhaps, just perhaps they will change their ways.

Controversial I know but quite frankly if I call someone out and they get upset I’m of an age where i am happy to say,

“F*** off and grow up”

We are only on this planet for a very short span of time so stop hating and learn to enjoy it.

One thought on “Labelled Racism

  1. “I suppose the question is why has it now become so ingrained in western societies and especially the English speaking ones that so many have racist views (the Brexit “we want our country back – to many immigrants, the Trump racist policies) and yet don’t think of themselves as racist.”
    ~ As a non-white individual and former British colonial subject, I also ask myself the same question. My conclusion is that racism is so interwoven within the institutions of our nations (UK & USA) that we are unable to perceive its tentacles.

    By the way, in the Anglophone Caribbean Region, the word “pickney” is more commonly used than “pickaninny” to describe a young child of African or Indian parentage, especially a poor one. According to the Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage, the word (and its variations) has its origin in the Portuguese word “pequenino” – little boy or little one – introduced during the early days of Portuguese slaving on the African Slave Coast and brought to the Caribbean by the slaves themselves.

    Like

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